ballet-of-gunfire
ballet-of-gunfire:

VOODOO AND JAZZ


"When Louis Armstrong was a kid in New Orleans he tried to get into the notorious “red light” district called Storyville to listen to the musicians. Storyville was a legally protected prostitution district in New Orleans that operated between 1898 and 1917. It was in the parlors of the bordellos and saloons that jazz was first played as a performing art. Louis Armstrong wasn’t born until 1904 and, understandably, the district did not like having children about.  However, if sex was the business of Storyville and jazz its anthem, Voodoo was its religion. Many Voodoo and Hoodoo Queens plied their gris-gris in the district; everything from powders to attract more lovers to sealing potions that would close a prostitute up so she couldn’t do business.  Armstrong was quick to identify the affinities of the district and use it to gain entrance. Rubbing two red bricks together he would manufacture a bucket of red brick dust. In New Orleans Voodoo one must always be on guard against gris-gris. Unlike the movies, a real gris-gris is always hidden from its target in order to disarm their taking any defensive measures. Knowing this, the astute New Orleanian always takes defensive measures. The classic uncrossing method being to scrub one’s door step with red brick dust every morning before exiting the house. When Armstrong appeared in the district with his bucket of red brick dust, he was granted a dispensation for his minor status because of the importance of, and demands for, his Voodoo product. In time, the district got used to seeing him until he came invisible to the discerning eye. When that happened, by his own admission, instead of leaving at dusk as he was supposed to, he would secret himself in yards and allies and wait until nightfall when he could listen to, and learn, jazz.”

ballet-of-gunfire:

VOODOO AND JAZZ

"When Louis Armstrong was a kid in New Orleans he tried to get into the notorious “red light” district called Storyville to listen to the musicians. Storyville was a legally protected prostitution district in New Orleans that operated between 1898 and 1917. It was in the parlors of the bordellos and saloons that jazz was first played as a performing art. Louis Armstrong wasn’t born until 1904 and, understandably, the district did not like having children about.  However, if sex was the business of Storyville and jazz its anthem, Voodoo was its religion. Many Voodoo and Hoodoo Queens plied their gris-gris in the district; everything from powders to attract more lovers to sealing potions that would close a prostitute up so she couldn’t do business.  Armstrong was quick to identify the affinities of the district and use it to gain entrance. Rubbing two red bricks together he would manufacture a bucket of red brick dust. In New Orleans Voodoo one must always be on guard against gris-gris. Unlike the movies, a real gris-gris is always hidden from its target in order to disarm their taking any defensive measures. Knowing this, the astute New Orleanian always takes defensive measures. The classic uncrossing method being to scrub one’s door step with red brick dust every morning before exiting the house. When Armstrong appeared in the district with his bucket of red brick dust, he was granted a dispensation for his minor status because of the importance of, and demands for, his Voodoo product. In time, the district got used to seeing him until he came invisible to the discerning eye. When that happened, by his own admission, instead of leaving at dusk as he was supposed to, he would secret himself in yards and allies and wait until nightfall when he could listen to, and learn, jazz.”